SHIPPING NOTICE

From May 5th to the 25th, our shipping operations will be temporarily closed. During this period, we will not be able to process shipments. However, we will continue to accept orders, and normal shipping services will resume on the 27st.

ALL NEW IBEX RELEASES!

The Ibex Release has the same impact point whether shot with the proper “Pull through method” or the more widely used “swivel method” as the neck and head stay consistent throughout the shot. The New Ibex stands alone as a completely New concept in releases.

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  • MADE IN THE USA

    Evolution components are machined and assembled in the USA

  • JEKYLL & HYDE

    Easily switch between fixed blade or mechanical with the same ferrule.

  • ZERO BLADE FAILURE

    Blades open every time, without exception.

JEKYLL & HYDE

One Broadhead — Multiple Configurations

The first of its kind, interchangeable broadhead

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LEARN MORE

EVOLUTION BROADHEADS

How do you operate the Jekyll & Hyde?

Please watch this video tutorial:https://youtu.be/uwK67jKlXko

Will the Hyde work for lower poundage bows?

Yes.

The Hyde has performed on large game with 40 pounds and above.

Where are the Jekyll and Hyde made?

The Jekyll and Hyde are manufactured and assembled in the USA. Blades are imported.

What is the cutting diameter of the Jekyll and Hyde?

The Jekyll has a main fixed blade of 1" in diameter with a front blade of 3/4" in diameter. Both these blades are sharpened on all sides to create a devastating wound channel. This magnifies on a shot that does not get a pass through. The Hyde has the same 3/4" front blade and the mechanicals are 5/8" in the closed position and are 2" when deployed. With 3 1/2" of total cutting surface.

How does the Jekyll & Hyde work on quartering shots?

They work great on  quartering shots and even severe quartering shots. The reason for this comes  back to the blade retention system and the curved blade design. With the expandable blades being sharpened to the tip, this creates a zero deflection.

How do the blades stay closed on the Hyde?

Please watch our video on how to operate Jekyll and Hyde here:https://youtu.be/uwK67jKlXko

How do I set the blades on the Hyde?

The Hyde broadhead has a patented locking system designed to be consistent on every shot.  

The pivot screw should just snug down the blades lightly to tighten the blades. The Hyde deploys on entry not impact & snug blade tension is normal. If they feel extremely tight you can loosen the pivot screw slightly. Based on the design, you may rest assured that the kick-out blades will not open during flight.

Does the Jekyll and Hyde work with a crossbow?

Yes, Evolution  Outdoors has designed a Crossbow specific version of the Jekyll and Hyde to match to O.D. of crossbow arrows and is extremely effective with crossbows.

They have been rated and tested to 505 FPS.

Does the Hyde open on impact?

Technically the Hyde is designed to start deploying on impact but they are open just inside the skin without draining kinetic energy. The Hyde is fully deployed just  inside the skin resulting in maximum damage without the loss of valuable  kinetic energy.

Can you shoot the Hyde through ground blind mesh?

Yes, you can shoot through ground blind mesh with the Hyde due to the fact that the blades are sharpened to the tip. There are no dull edges to snag the ground blind mesh.

Are both the Jekyll and Hyde field point accurate?

Both the Jekyll & Hyde were designed to have great flight in all conditions. Lets face it bowhunters want to screw on a broadhead and go hunting. We feel that both heads are field point accurate, to a point. We recommend that you take which ever broadhead you purchase and go out to the furthest distance that you can shoot a softball size group every time. (This will very with each person) Shoot the Jekyll or Hyde then shoot your field point, they should hit in the same place. When you get to longer ranges, say past 70 yards the Jekyll will fall off faster than the Hyde along with most fixed broadheads compared to your field point. This is due to the drag created from the exposed blades. For more detailed information please see our video for tuning and long range shooting.

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